All posts filed under: Journalism

Celebrating the Best of Culinary Innovation at Horeca Kuwait 2016

The 5th edition of the annual Hospitality and Food exhibition, Horeca Kuwait, has successfully grown in popularity over the years, devoted to showcasing the latest innovations and concepts in Food & Beverage, embracing gastronomic talents and creativity, and revealing the most recent trends and progress in the country’s hospitality sector. Bringing together an array of local and international exhibitors, the event drew in a great number of chefs from across the region, who successfully put Kuwait on the culinary map once more! Since 2015, the exhibition has risen from 190 participants to over 250 this year, consisting of local and international exhibitors, elaborate food displays, and a great number of chefs from all over region. “Five years ago, we started Horeca in Kuwait with only 35 exhibitors and less than 100 participants in the food contests. Today, we have over 60 exhibitors and sponsors, and over 250 participants in the competition, as well as over 6, 000 visitors,” says Mohammed Najia, General secretary for Kuwait Hotel owner Association and the Director for Horeca Organization Committee and Delegue …

Video Games are an Exciting New Step for Storytelling!

Let me start off by saying that I am a huge fan of video games. The adventure and role play genres are my favorite. And because of my enthusiasm for video games, I believe they are far more than what people define them these days- that they are a waste of time and promote lack of productivity. The first thing that comes to some peoples’ minds about video games, is that they are merely about mindless shooting and that only boys/children play them (don’t be surprised that I’m a female who enjoys playing ps4 and Grand Theft Auto!). But in fact, video games are an imagination engine and can even be inspirational, much like a book. What video games have reached is a middle-ground between books and movies, borrowing elements from both sides to intertwine narrative and visual storytelling. Unlike movies and books where the story is told as a sequence of events, games give you an avenue to discover the story on your own path. There’ve been endless debates about games in general. Common debates revolve around the …

Kuwait: We are strongly united

The devastating and monstrous incident that ripped through the Imam Al-Sadiq mosque, one of Kuwait’s oldest mosques, claimed the lives of many on June 26th, 2015, and was condemned internationally and has left an indelible imprint in the hearts of all Kuwaitis and its residents, and condemned internationally. The atrocity was a shock that many did not expect. Sorrow permeated the country. A ghastly attack against our land that was intended to divide us and disintegrate our closely-knitted society, only united us and revealed the true essence of the loyalty, pride, and strength embedded in the people of Kuwait. It is a tenacious testimony to the imperishable love and bond of the Kuwaiti people for their homeland irrespective of what religion they believe in or what background they are from. The boundless loyalty of the people and the immense determination to protect our homeland will diminish any threat to jeopardize the national unity of this country. In the end, we are all humans united to fight against the evils of this world and to transcend any form of divides.

A Ukrainian Childhood and Fond Memories

Every summer I traveled to my second hometown, Donetsk, to see my grandparents. Looking back at my memories as a child in Ukraine fills my heart with bittersweet nostalgia. A lot of things in my life trigger my memories of Ukraine. One of the simplest things, like to catch a faint whiff of dill, instantaneously evokes in me a vivid recollection of my grandparent’s house, it was like a gateway to the past, a flashback to my great and active and childhood that I feel so blessed to have had. Summer was always accompanied by scraped knees and purple-stained fingers. Our neighborhood had a huge infamous Mulberry tree right in the middle of it that stained the ground with purple spots, and reaching out to the highest branches (with the tastiest and most ripe berries) was always risky because they left indelible stains on my clothes! Being sort of a jungle kid I encountered many risks. I lived and spent a large portion of my childhood time outdoors; climbing trees, building tree houses out of branches and …

In Defense of Journalism and Journovation

Remember when people would say that journalism has reached its demise because print was considered dead with the advent of the internet? It’s either that or “what are you gonna do with a Journalism degree in Kuwait?” These are the two most common questions that come up during conversations about my future career plans as a reporter. Gone are the days when people would see journalism as a prestigious and hard-working profession, and gone are the days when peoples’ eyes would light up when you told them you studied journalism or worked as a journalist. Maybe its just me, but I noticed that such reactions are a handful in Kuwait, and most of them have now been substituted with with looks of confusion and even disappointment as if its something that is a thing of the past and doesn’t exist anymore. This itself is such a pity, and I always brush off this negativity. Journalism is not over nor will it ever be. What is happening is that journalism is adapting to the ever-changing world …

I didn’t think it could happen to me!

During my amazing trip to Singapore, we had a nice overdose of shopping and malls. There was one incident that I would like to share that occurred on my trip, which taught me a good lesson. One day we were at a mall doing some shopping. We walked past a kiosk called SEACREST that sold beauty products. I hadn’t heard of this brand before. An Asian saleslady handed me a sample of body lotion, and I gladly took it (BIG mistake). Before I knew it I was lured in by another olive-skinned sales lady who took me by the hand telling me “Come here, I’ll show you something amazing.” Being the naive girl, I was intrigued and followed her. My brother, sister-in-law , and her sister, stood by the sink while the sales lady applied some “sea salt” product on our hands and made us scrub them. As we washed it off she said, “see how smooth your skin is? It’s like baby skin!”. And it really was. We were enticed by the product and all …